Perspectives Amazons Reliability Could Make Huge Difference In Getting Patients To Actually

first_img Amazon has remade retail by adopting Apple founder Steve Jobs’s dictum of showing consumers what they want before they know they want it—and then getting it to them fast. CEO Jeff Bezos is now betting he can use this strategy to disrupt the pharmacy business, which could use the competition. This week Amazon announced it is paying $1 billion for online pharmacy PillPack. The five-year-old startup sorts prescriptions by dose and provides labels and directions for patients with a picture of each pill. This is a godsend for patients with chronic conditions who have difficulty following a regimen. Think of the 85-year-old with high cholesterol, anemia and arthritis. (6/29) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Despite investor enthusiasm for Amazon’s purchase of the online pharmacy PillPack, the giant online retailer needs to do more deals to catch CVS Health, Walgreens Boots Alliance and Walmart if it’s to compete in the U.S. prescription business. Most Americans get healthcare coverage through health insurance companies that control where the prescription is picked up or how it’s delivered. PillPack is in several health insurance and Medicare Part D drug plan networks, which is important as CVS, Walgreens and Walmart are forming closer ties with health insurers to lock up their customers in insurer networks. (Bruce Japsen, 7/2) If Amazon’s move to disrupt health care is going to make Americans any healthier, the improvement is most likely to take place in the business of getting prescription drugs to patients more reliably. For one thing, there’s plenty of room for improvement. Failure to take prescription drugs kills about 125,000 Americans a year, according to a recent review in the Annals of Internal Medicine, and this form of noncompliance costs the health care system $100 billion to $289 billion a year. PillPack — the online pharmacy service that Amazon.com Inc. bought this week — already simplifies health care for its customers by pre-sorting multiple prescriptions. Amazon could do even more by cutting down on the 20 to 30 percent of prescriptions that are reportedly never filled, easing communications between doctors and patients, and helping the medical community collect useful data on side effects and customer satisfaction. (Faye Flam, 6/29) CNBC: High Drug Prices Caused By US Patent System, Not ‘Foreign Freeloaders’ Forbes: PillPack Aside, Amazon’s Far From Catching CVS And Walgreens The Hill: Pharmacists Can Help Manage Drug Costs If State And Federal Laws Just Let Them The Wall Street Journal: Amazon The Rx Disrupter Dallas Morning News: Doctors Should Know The Cost Of The Drugs They Prescribe, But Most Don’t The Hill: The Trump Plan To Reduce Drug Prices — Are American Patients First? center_img For decades, our government has attempted to address one of the most pressing health care problems in our country — skyrocketing drug prices — to little avail. This week, Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar testified before the Senate Finance Committee addressing the challenges of prescription drug affordability for millions of Americans. But there is another high cost of prescription drugs often overlooked: The most expensive drug may be the one not taken, or not taken as recommended by physicians and pharmacists. The good news for patients is that they are not alone when dealing with medication challenges. Pharmacists are in a good position to assist, if state and federal laws would allow. (Lucinda Maine, 6/29) Americans continue to suffer the highest prescription drug costs of anyone in the world. One in four are unable to fill prescriptions due to high prices, according to a recent poll. And even though drug prices tripled over the last decade, analysts predict they will double again in the next ten years. We have a runaway problem on our hands, and while new proposals from Congress and the president seek to improve the drug pricing system, we will fail to reach lasting solutions unless we address a root factor in this national crisis: patents. (Tahir Amin, 6/27) Perspectives: Amazon’s Reliability Could Make Huge Difference In Getting Patients To Actually Take Their Pills Read recent commentaries about drug-cost issues. Forbes: Sticker Shock: The Real Cost Of America’s 10 Most Expensive Drugs The high price of pharmaceuticals has become a constant topic of conversation in the U.S. As medical costs rise, consumers face greater financial uncertainty. And day after day, both the White House and Congress make promises that they will lower prescription costs to alleviate constituent concerns, but few changes have backed up their words. That said, time and again we are reminded that despite the rising costs of pharma, the medical industry is exceptionally complex and very rarely do patients see the real price tag of their drugs. And that lack of information – not to mention the number of third-party entities that get involved – creates a confusing and frustrating, and often bloated, price structure. (Nicole Fisher, 6/26) On July 1, more than 30,000 new doctors will begin medical residency and have the honor of serving patients across the spectrum of health care. I am one of them. And I’m concerned that we will contribute to the $750 billion epidemic of excessive health care spending, according to a 2012 Institute of Medicine report, and risk financially hurting our patients if we do not know the cost of what we prescribe. Most patients are in a black box about the specific cost of health care services. A national poll from the West Health Institute and the University of Chicago shows that 4 in 10 Americans skip medical tests or treatment because they are too expensive, and, according to an Ipsos survey, 85 percent of Americans are concerned with the cost of health care. (Hussain Lalani, 6/29) Cancer drug prices continue to increase by 10 to 12 percent every year. Spending on cancer drugs doubled in the past five years, and will double again by 2022. All cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2017 were priced above $160,000 per year. Patients are additionally burdened with crushing out-of-pocket prescription expenses. Effective solutions to lower cancer drug prices were outlined in many commentaries, and became part of the 2016 presidential campaign agendas. (Hagop Kantarjian and Vivian Ho, 7/1) Bloomberg: What An Amazon Pharmacy Could Solve, And What It Won’t last_img read more

Powerful Health Care Players Gear Up To Push Back Against SinglePayer In

first_img Powerful health-care interests worried that a Democratic “blue wave” could give new energy to single-payer health-care legislation have created a new group to take on the issue. The formation of the Partnership for America’s Health Care Future is a sign of the health-care industry’s alarm over growing support for a single payer health-care law within the Democratic Party. (Sullivan, 8/10) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. The Hill: Fearing ‘Blue Wave,’ Drug, Insurance Companies Build Single-Payer Defense center_img Powerful Health Care Players Gear Up To Push Back Against Single-Payer In Case ‘Blue Wave’ Hits Hard Industry players who usually don’t work together are bonding over the potential push for a single-payer system, which has become a litmus test among progressive Democrats.last_img

Does Verizon Wireless have 5G up and running in the US

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. The race to 5G connectivity is well under way in the United States, with the major networks now rolling out next-gen services in many cities around the country.We covered the state of play for AT&T’s 5G plans earlier this week, but what of its chief rival, the Verizon Wireless network in the US? Both companies have around 35% of the gigantic US market, give or take, so the smooth roll out of 5G services might be the key to breaking the deadlock.While AT&T isn’t offering any 5G-capable smartphones to consumers at this time, Verizon has a jump start, selling the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G as well as the Moto Mod 5G that brings 5G connectivity to the existing Motorola Z4 and Z3 handsets.Related: What is 5G?It’s also getting its 5G Ultra Wideband network up and running in a couple of major US cities, ahead of a wider rollout throughout 2019.Where is Verizon 5G available?Currently, Verizon 5G is only available in the cities of Chicago and Minneapolis in the United States, where the speed and reliability is rapidly improving. The company has promised to bring 5G connectivity to 20 more cities by the end of 2019. They are also follows:Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas, Des Moines, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City (MO), Little Rock, Memphis, Phoenix, Providence, Salt Lake City, San Diego, Washington, DC.How fast is Verizon 5G?In the cities where 5G is currently available, peak speeds are currently hitting in excess of 1Gbps for downloads and 60Mbps for uploads. Earlier adopters are reporting typical download speeds of around 700Mbps it good service areas.Here’s The Verge’s Chris Welch downloading a 90-minute movie in Prime Video’s best quality in a minute and a half: Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. 5G Downloaded Iron Man 2 from Prime Video at “best” quality in 90 seconds. You can see here that Verizon’s network occasionally fell back to 4G LTE. I’m right across the street from the 5G node. pic.twitter.com/TAh2YgmzwD— Chris Welch (@chriswelch) May 16, 2019How much does Verizon 5G cost?Surprisingly, Verizon isn’t charging the earth for access to the next-gen speeds, where they are available. A 5G plan costs an extra $10 a month over its 4G LTE counterpart. However, given the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G costs an eye-popping $1,300, the true price of adaption is steep.The cheapest means of getting 5G right now is via the Moto Mod 5G, which is currently on sale for just $50 on Verizon right now, down from the usual $349.99 retail price. You will need a Moto Z3 or Z4 smartphone to clip the Mod to.last_img read more

Has Apple stopped innovating Jony Ive seems to think so

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor Has Apple stopped innovating? Superstar designer Jony Ive seems to think so, at least according to his earlier promise to leave Apple and go it alone if the company ever stopped innovating. Late on Wednesday evening, Apple announced that Ive would be leaving the company to start up his own design firm. Buried in an interview about product design from 2014 with UK paper The Times, Ive claimed that he would only ever leave the company if Apple stopped innovating, as that was the reason he stayed. Related: Best iPhone 2019“Yes. I’d stop. I’d make things for myself, for my friends at home instead. The bar needs to be high,” said Ive, when queried about this. Back in 2014, he added “I don’t think that will happen, We are at the beginning of a remarkable time, when a remarkable number of products will be developed. When you think about technology and what it has enabled us to do so far, and what it will enable us to do in the future, we’re not even close to any kind of limit. It’s still so, so new.”There’s no word on what finally made him decide “Ive got to go”, but it could be the atrocious cheesegrater stylings of the Mac Pro, or the fact he’s spent the last few years designing furniture for Apple’s Headquarters.Still, if he is genuinely disheartened at Apple, you wouldn’t know it. Ive’s next adventure is a creative agency called LoveFrom, which will launch in 2020 and have Apple as its very first client. However, if you could claim that Apple was having trouble innovating with Ive, it’ll have a much harder time without him. As the designer behind the iPod, iPod Mini, iPhone, iPad and a few things that don’t have an i in the title, he’s become synonymous with Apple’s remarkable feats of design. last_img read more

WatchUS government shutdown likely to stretch into 2019 amid border wall standoff

first_img 0 Comments U.S. government shutdown likely to stretch into 2019 amid border wall standoff Trump threatens to close the U.S.-Mexico border until standoff is resolved Comment The U.S. data report a US$17.1 billion goods deficit with Canada in 2017, and a US$71 billion goods deficit with Mexico. Both countries, however, reported substantially larger U.S. goods surpluses in the same relationship. In 2017, Canada reported a US$97.7 billion surplus, and Mexico a US$132.4 billion surplus.Senators have been told they’ll vote only once there’s a deal backed by Democrats and by Trump, who is demanding US$5 billion for a wall at the southern border, his central campaign promise. Democrats call such spending wasteful and ineffective. The standoff produced a fresh round of finger-pointing late on Thursday afternoon.White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders issued a statement outlining Trump’s demands that didn’t include the word “wall.” She said later there was no significance to that omission.“The president has made clear that any bill to fund the government must adequately fund border security to stop the flow of illegal drugs, criminals, MS-13 gang members, child smugglers and human traffickers into our communities— and protect the American people,” she said. “The president does not want the government to remain shut down, but he will not sign a proposal that does not first prioritize our county’s safety and security.”The White House is flexible on the composition of the border wall Trump has demanded, one official said, noting that the president has used a variety of terms to describe it in recent days including slats, fence and barrier.Sanders complained that Democrats haven’t responded to a compromise offer conveyed by Vice President Mike Pence late last week, and that the opposition party “decided to go home” while Trump stayed in Washington over Christmas to negotiate.Underscoring the pressure Trump is facing from some in his own party, Representative Louie Gohmert of Texas said Friday on Fox News that the shutdown should continue “until Hell freezes over” if needed to secure funding for the barrier.Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer rejected the offer from Pence, said his spokesman, Justin Goodman. The New York Democrat told Pence that Democrats won’t consider any offer without a public endorsement by Trump because the president has changed his position so often, said Goodman, who added the two sides remain far apart.Three OptionsHouse Democrats answered in kind.“Democrats have offered Republicans three options to reopen government that all include funding for strong, sensible, and effective border security — but not the president’s immoral, ineffective and expensive wall,” said Drew Hammill, a spokesman for Nancy Pelosi, who’s expected to become speaker of the House when Democrats take control of the chamber next week.Earlier in the day, Trump said that most federal employees who aren’t receiving paychecks because of the government shutdown are Democrats.“Do the Dems realize that most of the people not getting paid are Democrats?” Trump tweeted Thursday morning, prompting outrage from some in Congress. The president provided no evidence to support the claim, which he made only days after characterizing federal employees as supporters of the wall and the partial shutdown.Virginia Senator Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the chamber’s intelligence committee, called Trump’s tweet “outrageous,” adding on Twitter on Thursday that “federal employees don’t go to work wearing red or blue jerseys.”The president, who returned to Washington early Thursday from a trip to visit U.S. troops in Iraq, tweeted about the standoff later, accusing Democrats of “OBSTRUCTION of the desperately needed Wall.”Volatility returned to U.S. markets, with stocks bouncing back from the lows of the day after flirting with a bear market amid higher interest rates and the political turmoil in Washington. The S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average turned green in a late jump after trading negative for most of the day.Federal workers will begin to lose money starting with Friday’s paycheque, according to National Treasury Employees Union President Tony Reardon. That cheque will reflect work through last Saturday, the day the shutdown began. That means Saturday shift workers, including many in Customs and Border Protection, won’t see pay for that day in their cheques.All workers in the nine departments and dozens of agencies with funding lapses will miss their Jan. 11 paycheck if the shutdown continues, he said in an interview.“I’ve had members come to me saying they are returning holiday and Christmas presents they bought because they are worried about paying rent,” Reardon said. He said he was disappointed that Congress wasn’t in session working to reopen the government.During the shutdown, Reardon said, “parks are being left open to illegal activity and vandalism, industrial complaints are going unanswered, the SEC isn’t investigating securities fraud and the IRS will have trouble implementing the largest legislative overhaul of the tax code in a generation.”The Office of Personnel Management released form letters that furloughed workers could use to negotiate with creditors.GOP Senator Pat Roberts of Kansas, who presided over his chamber’s brief session, said regarding government workers, “We respect them and we hope we can get this solved as quickly as possible.”In addition, thousands of U.S. home sales are being held up because the shutdown has halted the issuance of new flood insurance policies. The Federal Emergency Management Administration stopped issuing new policies under the National Flood Insurance Program. FEMA, which oversees disaster response, is part of the Department of Homeland Security.House members have been told they’ll get 24 hours’ notice if they need to travel back to Washington to vote on any deal.Jim McGovern, the incoming Democratic chairman of the House Rules Committee, said if there isn’t a resolution by Jan. 3 when the new Congress is sworn in, the Democratic majority will vote on a stopgap spending measure to reopen the government agencies. He said Democratic leaders are discussing whether funding would last until Feb. 8 like the Senate-passed bill, for the full fiscal year through September, or until some other date.Republicans say they’re still waiting for Democrats to respond to an offer from the White House last Saturday. The administration said it would accept US$2.1 billion for border barriers along with a US$400 million flexible fund for immigration priorities. Democrats dismissed the offer as hollow because Trump has said publicly he still wants US$5 billion for a wall.New Year’s RecessCongress is scheduled to return on Monday although no votes are scheduled, and lawmakers will be in recess on New Year’s Day. The current Congress ends at noon Jan. 3, when new members elected in November’s midterm election will take their oaths.“I don’t see a scenario where the government opens back up before a new Congress is sworn in,” Representative Ryan Costello, a retiring Pennsylvania Republican, said on MSNBC Thursday. House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows sought to blame the shutdown on Schumer in a tweet Thursday urging the New York Democrat to accept US$5 billion for a wall.“The House passed it. The WH wants it. The Senate majority wants it. The one blocking an open government and a secure border: Chuck Schumer,” Republican Meadows tweeted.–With assistance from Alyza Sebenius.Bloomberg.com Bloomberg News Email Twitter Facebook Related Stories U.S. government shutdown will have cost America $1.2 billion by tomorrow U.S. government out past the weekend with no House vote Friday December 28, 20189:18 AM EST Filed under News Economy More Trump renews attacks on Federal Reserve, calls it the U.S. economy’s ‘only problem’ Donald Trump threatened to close the U.S.-Mexico border on Friday as a week-long partial government shutdown appeared likely to stretch into 2019 because of an impasse over funding for the president’s proposed border wall.“We will be forced to close the Southern Border entirely if the Obstructionist Democrats do not give us the money to finish the Wall & also change the ridiculous immigration laws that our Country is saddled with,” Trump said on Twitter.Trump’s latest ultimatum comes a day after House Republicans said they didn’t plan any votes this week and as the president sought to shift blame to Democrats for a stalemate over funding for a wall that a majority of Americans don’t support, according to polls. It echoed a threat he made in November, when he said he’d close the border “for a long time” if Mexican authorities couldn’t quell attempts by large groups of migrants to cross into the U.S.U.S. government out past the weekend with no House vote FridayU.S. government shutdown will have cost America $1.2 billion by tomorrowU.S. government shutdown enters third day with no urgency to reopen after everyone leaves townThere was no sign of any progress toward a plan to fund nine government departments that closed after funding ran out Dec. 21. The Senate and House held brief sessions Thursday afternoon, and neither chamber took any votes.Details of any potential closing of the 1,954-mile (3,145 kilometre) border with Mexico aren’t yet clear. Mexico is America’s third-largest trading partner in goods with US$557.6 billion in two-way trade during 2017, according to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. Trade in services accounted for another US$58 billion.Trump said in another tweet that the U.S. “looses soooo much money on Trade with Mexico under NAFTA, over 75 Billion Dollars a year (not including Drug Money which would be many times that amount), that I would consider closing the Southern Border a ‘profit making operation.”’A sign announcing the closure of the National Archives due to a partial government shutdown is displayed in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 27, 2018. Share this storyU.S. government shutdown likely to stretch into 2019 amid border wall standoff Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Join the conversation → Redditlast_img read more

SEAT Electric Car Uses 440 LBS of Dry Ice Daily

Video description:A socket, a battery weighing almost half a tonne and 200 kilos of dry ice every day in the box at the race track. These are some of the features that have emerged with the rise of electric racecars, and the new models have completely changed the way racing teams do their work. CUPRA engineer Xavier Serra, mechanic Jordi Martí and race driver Jordi Gené explain the keys of this transformation during a day of testing with the e-Racer: – Learning how to drive all over again: With 30 years of experience, CUPRA driver and ambassador Jordi Gené admits that getting behind the wheel of an electric racecar “implies learning from scratch”. “The driving style is completely different and now you have to use other parameters in order to know t what speed you’re driving, how to negotiate a corner or the right time to apply the brake”, he adds. For example, this vehicle’s greater weight and different sound change the references received by a driver while driving. As it is able to reach 100 km/h in 3.2 seconds, Gené assures that the “the feeling of acceleration of the e-Racer is much more forceful, and the adrenaline rush is even bigger”. -200 kg of dry ice every day: During one of the laps, an indicator displays a warning that the driver has to return to boxes to cool the battery. Cooling it down with dry ice is one of the jobs of the mechanic. Furthermore, the engineers also have new strategies on their hands: “It’s not just about being the fastest; now we have another factor to consider: energy management. We must learn how to monitor the temperature and the range”, explains team leader Xavier Serra. In this sense, positioning the 450 kilo battery “was one of the biggest challenges we had to face” when developing this model. The team had to distribute the volume of the battery underneath the car in order to maintain its balance and functionality. -A new ritual: “After working for more than 20 years in this profession I never would have thought I could charge up a racecar with a plug”, says CUPRA mechanic Jordi Martí while he gets the e-Racer ready to exit the box again. Even the tools he uses are different. Now he has a set of specially designed instruments to withstand high voltage, such as gloves made with insulating material that can resist up to 1,000 volts. -The future of motorsport: “The arrival of the electric vehicle to racing signals the beginning of a new era”, concludes Xavier Serra. Being a part of the team that has developed and is testing the first wholly electric racing touring car in the world “is like being a part of a historic moment”, says the mechanic. “It’s a very interesting professional challenge”, adds Gené. The tests carried out on different tracks confirm the competitiveness of the CUPRA e-Racer, which is expected to make its debut in the ETCR category in 2020. This is a positive move towards cleaner, more efficient Racing, where technology and connectivity play a key role.Source: YouTube via DPCcars Blame the battery.When the electric version of the International Touring Car Championship, the e-TCR, sees its first green flag, there’s a very good chance the Seat Cupra e-Racer will be part of the field of contenders. This 670-horsepower monster hatchback has some pretty eye-opening cooling requirements, though. As you can see in the video above, it sublimates 440 pounds of dry ice — frozen CO2 — a day as it continues its development program.More CUPRA e-Racer action SEAT Confirms E TCR Racing Series Intention With CUPRA e-Racer Watch As 670-HP, Rear-Wheel-Drive Cupra E-Racer Hits The Track Cupra e-Racer – A Proper Electric Racing Car In Geneva Source: Electric Vehicle News According to the write up in this video’s description (complete text below), the car doesn’t use the cold stuff to put a chill on its Rimac-supplied electric motors. Nope. Apparently, it’s the 990-lb battery that needs the extra help to keep its cool. It takes only 20 minutes of track time for it to light up a heat-warning indicator on the dash, at which point it rolls into the pits and gets hooked up to its cooldown machine: a simple box with a tray for dry ice which blows a blast of chilled air through ducting over the battery pack.It appears as though they also take advantage of this downtime to put more charge in the battery — an activity that creates even more heat and takes about 50 minutes to accomplish. It’s just one of the ways racing electric is different from the internal combustion paradigm.  Check out the video above for more changes. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 8, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

Sumitomo Electrics new generation of SiC transistors offer low onstate resistance

first_imgSumitomo Electric’s new V-groove superjunction transistors, which it developed through a joint research project with the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) use silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductors, and the company claims they offer the lowest on-state resistance yet achieved in an SiC transistor.Sumitomo has already developed V-groove MOSFETs that use a particular plane orientation (0-33-8) for the channel that turns the flow of electrons on and off, forming an oxide film interface with low defects and achieving a low on-state resistance. According to Sumitomo, the low-defect performance of the VMOSFETs significantly stabilizes the threshold voltage fluctuation that has prevented the practical use of SiC transistors.Sumitomo has adopted a superjunction structure to reduce on-state resistance. The superjunction structure has been commercialized for silicon transistors, but has remained in a principle verification stage for SiC transistors, due to problems in manufacturing methods. In a recent study, Sumitomo overcame the problems by repeating epitaxial growth and ion implantation to form a narrow-pitch pillar structure, and achieved the SiC superjunction structure for the VMOSFETs. The new transistors have achieved a low on-state resistance of 1,170 V / 0.63 mΩ∙cm2. Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine Source: Sumitomo Electriclast_img read more

Toshack puts his faith in youth

first_imgShare on Facebook First published on Mon 17 Nov 2008 19.03 EST Mon 17 Nov 2008 19.03 EST Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Shares00 Share via Email This article is more than 10 years old Share on Twitter Toshack puts his faith in youth This article is more than 10 years old Share via Email Friendlies news Wales Share on Pinterest Share on Facebook @SachinNakrani Sachin Nakrani Wales will be relying heavily on raw talent in tomorrow’s friendly in Denmark. John Toshack, the manager, flew to Copenhagen yesterday with the youngest squad in the country’s history, which included seven teenagers and 12 players still eligible for the Under-21s.Toshack’s hand has partly been forced after injury ruled out five senior players, but the Wales assistant manager, Dean Saunders, still believes that by selecting a squad with an average age of 21 the manager has shown his willingness to give his prospective stars a chance to shine.”John has done brilliantly for all of them,” said Saunders. “It has taken a bit of time but there is some extremely good young talent around which bodes well for the future and our chance of qualifying for a major tournament finals in five or six years.”What has particularly pleased Saunders is that, having been given their debuts by Toshack, some of Wales’ young players such as Aaron Ramsey and Chris Gunter have gone on to secure moves to Premier League clubs. “It was not so long ago that we had just two or three players in the Premier League,” said Saunders. ” But now we have got a lot more playing against the best players in the world and that can only be a good thing.”While Wales are drooling over their crop of future stars, Northern Ireland have stepped up the process of finding their own. The manager, Nigel Worthington, has asked to be kept informed on a regular basis about the country’s Under-21, -19 and -17 teams and has promised to watch them in action much more often. The senior side face Hungary in a friendly in Belfast tomorrow night. Wales Topics Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

SEC Says That Its Not Easy Determining Whether Teva Whistleblowers Are Deserving

first_img Learn More & Register This previous post highlighted a whistleblower’s attempt (referred to as John Doe) to force the SEC to speed its award decision making process in connection with the $519 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement against Teva Pharmaceutical in late 2016. (See here for the prior post).Recently, the SEC filed this response brief stating that the SEC’s Office of the Whistleblower (OWB) is reviewing Doe’s application, but a preliminary determination has not yet been issued. Using words such as complex, rigorous, time consuming and labor intensive, the SEC argues that making a determination on Doe’s claim is not a simple task particularly given that the SEC “must balance its desire to process award claims within a reasonable period with the need to devote resources to other important Commission responsibilities.”In pertinent part, the response brief states:“Doe argues that the Commission has unduly delayed adjudicating his whistleblower award application and asks for an order directing the Commission to issue a preliminary determination regarding his claim within 60 days and a final order within six months. Doe’s Petition is predicated primarily upon his assertion that adjudicating his claim is a “simple task” that requires little more than “a conversation” between SEC claim reviewers and investigative staff and review of a “confined record entirely within the agency’s knowledge.” Doe claims there is “no reason to believe that [his] claim for a whistleblower award is substantially more complex” than “simple cases with one whistleblower” that the SEC resolved more quickly.Doe greatly misapprehends the work, effort, and time involved in reviewing whistleblower claims, including his. Doe overlooks the substantial complexities involved in adjudicating claims regarding the Teva matter because, among other things, there are six claimants in this matter (not only Doe as he apparently presumes) and the case involves parallel SEC and DOJ cases, requiring information gathering from the DOJ and other authorities. And Doe ignores that the SEC is processing a voluminous number of other whistleblower applications that require the attention of the Commission in addition to his claim.”Regarding the other whistleblower claims in connection with the Teva FCPA matter, the SEC states:“Doe suggests that he is the only claimant for NoCA 2017-5 and that the Commission need only assess the information he provided regarding the Teva investigations to reach a determination on his application. Doe is incorrect. There are six claimants whose claims must be assessed to determine their absolute and relative entitlements, if any, to an award.Doe’s claims. Doe submitted 700+ pages in support of his application, and asserts that the “record establishes that the SEC and DOJ acted on Petitioner’s tip and used the information supplied to successfully resolve their enforcement actions against Teva.” Teva paid nearly $520 million to resolve FCPA claims relating to improper payments in Russia, Ukraine, and Mexico, while Doe’s tips focused on payments in Argentina that were not encompassed in the Commission’s settlement with Teva. Doe also apparently presumes that the SEC staff to whom he spoke in 2011 “eventually transferred the case to the SEC’s Miami office,” which handled the Teva investigation. But Doe is not privy to SEC internal actions, other tips that the Commission may have received or the degree to which those tips may have led to the Commission’s investigation and/or prosecution of Teva. Finally, the fact that a whistleblower provides useful assistance at some point during the course of an investigation does not necessarily mean that he provided “original information” that “led to the successful enforcement” action, and therefore may be eligible for an award.Other ClaimantsThere are five other claimants who believe that they are entitled to whistleblower awards because of the testimony and documents they provided to the SEC, DOJ, and/or other authorities. While the merits of any claimant’s application are beyond the scope of the Petition, the bases for their claims are very briefly described to provide a sense of the competing claims that OWB reviewers must evaluate.Claimant 2 Claimant 2 contends that he or she provided the information that led the SEC to open its investigation. (This claim directly contradicts Doe’s claim and the relative merits of Claimant 2’s assertions must be assessed.) Claimant 2 claims that he or she met repeatedly with the SEC and DOJ to provide testimony and documents that were central to the charges against Teva. Claimant 2’s counsel, like Doe’s counsel, filed a detailed whistleblower application with extensive documentation purportedly buttressing his or her entitlement to an award.Claimants 3 and 4 Claimants 3 and 4 submitted a joint application. They claim that they provided multiple tips to the SEC, DOJ, and local authorities concerning improper payments in Romania. They claim that the information and documents they provided led to law enforcement inquiries and press reports about these payments. They contend that the inquiry in Romania, at least in part, led to Teva’s willingness to pay such a large monetary sanction. Their counsel, like Doe’s counsel, filed a detailed whistleblower application with extensive documentation purportedly buttressing their entitlement to an award.Claimant 5 Claimant 5 alleges that he or she provided extensive information and documents showing misconduct by Teva, including misconduct in Argentina. Therefore, to the extent information concerning misconduct in Argentina is relevant to the ultimate recovery, the Commission must weigh the contributions of Doe and Claimant 5. Claimant 5 claims that he or she met with SEC and DOJ investigators on multiple occasions and his or her application includes detailed documentation of the assistance he or she purportedly provided to the authorities.Claimant 6 Claimant 6 contends that he or she reported various improper sales practices to the SEC, including information about Argentina, requiring an analysis of competing claims of at least three claimants (Doe and Claimants 5 and 6). Claimant 6 contends that he or she met with, and provided documents to, the SEC and DOJ to assist in their investigations. Claimant 6’s award application highlights the various documents that he or she purportedly provided to authorities in support of their investigations.”Regardless of the merits of Doe’s claim (or that of the other claimants) the SEC’s response brief makes for an interesting read regarding the process of assessing of a whistleblower claim. FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available.last_img read more

Researchers work to identify areas of the brain that help us wake

first_imgJun 22 2018Philosophers have pondered the nature of consciousness for thousands of years. In the 21st century, the debate over how the brain gives rise to our everyday experience continues to puzzle scientists. To help, researchers in the University of Michigan Medical School Center for Consciousness Science are working to identify areas of the brain that help us wake up, a basic building block of everyday consciousness.In the search for what controls our overall level of consciousness, researchers have traditionally focused on structures in the lower part of the brain. These structures include the brainstem (which regulates vital functions like breathing, blood pressure and heartbeat); the hypothalamus (which is involved in sleep and controlling bodily functions); and the thalamus (which relays information from the senses). George Mashour, M.D., Ph.D., professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and director of the center, decided to look at different areas of the cortex, the upper part of the brain, for its ability to control the level of consciousness.Recent research in nonhuman primates provides evidence that the prefrontal cortex has a switchboard-like relationship with other areas of the brain, helping to ignite awareness of visual information.”There has been a debate that has recently intensified as to whether or not the prefrontal cortex -; versus areas farther back -; plays a role in generating conscious experience. We thought that we’d target some of these different areas in the front and back of the brain to see which ones had the ability to control the level of consciousness,” he says.The key to ignition?Because anesthesia is used to temporarily eliminate conscious experience during medical procedures, it provides the perfect opportunity to test hypotheses about consciousness.Mashour and lead-author Dinesh Pal, Ph.D., also of the Department of Anesthesiology, anesthetized rats with a common anesthetic used in humans. “We wanted to see what had the causal power to take an unconscious brain receiving ongoing anesthesia and wake it up,” says Pal. To test this, they targeted two neurotransmitters that are associated with wakefulness: acetylcholine and norepinephrine.Related StoriesUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleepAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaNovel bed system with VR brainwave-control for sleep blissThe team exposed the anesthetized rats’ prefrontal and parietal cortex to drugs that ramped up the effect of the neurotransmitters and measured their brain activity and behavior. When exposed to an acetylcholine-receptor activator, their brain waves, normally slow during sleep and anesthesia, sped up. But rats were able to start behaving as though they were awake only with prefrontal cortex stimulation, all while continuing to receive the same level of anesthesia that is used clinically for surgery in humans. These findings were published in the journal Current Biology.Mashour says their new study “suggests that the prefrontal cortex also has the potential to play a role in coordinating the level of consciousness, possibly through the cholinergic system.”Clinically, these results could be explored for applications in people with disorders of consciousness, such as coma or vegetative states. “Let’s say you have a patient in a coma: Could the prefrontal cortex be a site that is modulated to help coordinate events to help improve level of consciousness?” Mashour asks. The implications of this possibility are significant because of the relative accessibility of the prefrontal cortex.”It’s very difficult and dangerous to directly intervene at the level of arousal centers in the brainstem because of its location, small size and nearby vital functions. Maybe the prefrontal cortex is an accessible gateway to some of those other arousal systems that could be leveraged in a clinical setting outside of anesthesia,” he says. Source:https://labblog.uofmhealth.org/lab-report/waking-up-hard-to-do-reversing-deep-unconsciousnesslast_img read more

Purdue startup to create sensor that provides early detection of mosquitoborne diseases

first_imgJul 13 2018A startup created by Purdue University professors is developing a sensor that can detect dangerous mosquito-borne tropical diseases faster and at a lower cost than current methods, giving health officials time to take action before the viruses are transmitted to humans.SMK Diagnostics has created biosensor technology to identify and monitor diseases such as Zika, which set off a global health crisis in 2015 and 2016, and dengue, which causes about 22,000 deaths a year worldwide, mostly among children. Dengue and Zika are from the same family of virus known as flavivirus.”The sensor provides early detection so you can intervene earlier,” said Lia Stanciu, associate head and professor of Materials Engineering at Purdue and one of the founders of SMK Diagnostics. “If local agencies know there’s a danger, they can intervene early to try to make sure it doesn’t get transmitted to people.”SMK Diagnostics was started by Stanciu, Ernesto Marinero, a professor or materials engineering and electrical and computer engineering at Purdue, and Richard Kuhn, the Trent and Judith Anderson Distinguished Professor of Science at Purdue. Kuhn was the first scientist to determine the structure of the Zika virus by cryo-electron microscopy.Related StoriesWar against mosquitoes saves lives and money in Sri LankaNitrogen-rich diet reduces mosquitoes’ ability to transmit ZikaFDA approves first vaccine for prevention of dengue disease in endemic regionsThe technology uses an electrode coated with a material that has a high surface area that immobilizes specific biological molecules able to bind to the RNA of the virus. When the DNA or RNA of a virus infected mosquito binds to the surface, it changes the surface resistance on the electrode. The sensor can determine if the virus is present.”Only the virus will bind to the surface, no other molecules. It is a recognition, like a key and lock,” Stanciu said.The sensor can differentiate between specific flaviviruses and works in less than an hour. Other technology to detect these diseases in mosquitoes are time-consuming, taking a week or longer to discover what the virus may be.Stanciu hopes to use the technology to place sensors where disease-carrying mosquitoes populate.”That way local agencies know there is a danger so they can take action to eradicate the virus before it spreads to people,” she said.The sensor detects viruses. It doesn’t work on bacteria-based diseases, such as malaria.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Zika can cause severe birth defects in babies whose mothers were infected during pregnancy and warns pregnant women from traveling to areas at risk for Zika. The CDC says more than one-third of the world’s population live in areas at risk for dengue, with up to 400 million people a year infected.The Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization helped secure a patent for the technology for SMK Diagnostics, which started with the help of the Purdue Foundry.SMK Diagnostics is looking for funding to build a prototype and move the technology forward.Source: https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2018/Q3/purdue-researchers-developing-device-that-detects-mosquito-borne-diseases,-giving-health-officials-time-to-take-action.htmllast_img read more

Restoring mitochondrial function to reverse agingrelated skin wrinkles hair loss in mice

first_imgJul 20 2018Wrinkled skin and hair loss are hallmarks of aging. What if they could be reversed?Keshav Singh, Ph.D., and colleagues have done just that, in a mouse model developed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. When a mutation leading to mitochondrial dysfunction is induced, the mouse develops wrinkled skin and extensive, visible hair loss in a matter of weeks. When the mitochondrial function is restored by turning off the gene responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction, the mouse returns to smooth skin and thick fur, indistinguishable from a healthy mouse of the same age.”To our knowledge, this observation is unprecedented,” said Singh, a professor of genetics in the UAB School of Medicine.Importantly, the mutation that does this is in a nuclear gene affecting mitochondrial function, the tiny organelles known as the powerhouses of the cells. Numerous mitochondria in cells produce 90 percent of the chemical energy cells need to survive.In humans, a decline in mitochondrial function is seen during aging, and mitochondrial dysfunction can drive age-related diseases. A depletion of the DNA in mitochondria is also implicated in human mitochondrial diseases, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, age-associated neurological disorders and cancer.”This mouse model,” Singh said, “should provide an unprecedented opportunity for the development of preventive and therapeutic drug development strategies to augment the mitochondrial functions for the treatment of aging-associated skin and hair pathology and other human diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction plays a significant role.”The mutation in the mouse model is induced when the antibiotic doxycycline is added to the food or drinking water. This causes depletion of mitochondrial DNA because the enzyme to replicate the DNA becomes inactive.In four weeks, the mice showed gray hair, reduced hair density, hair loss, slowed movements and lethargy, changes that are reminiscent of natural aging. Wrinkled skin was seen four to eight weeks after induction of the mutation, and females had more severe skin wrinkles than males.Dramatically, this hair loss and wrinkled skin could be reversed by turning off the mutation. The photos below show the hair loss and wrinkled skin after two months of doxycycline induction, and the same mouse a month later after doxycycline was stopped, allowing restoration of the depleted mitochondrial DNA.Related StoriesHair loss could soon be a thing of the past, say researchersResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairScientists discover how resistance to the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil arisesLittle change was seen in other organs when the mutation was induced, suggesting an important role for mitochondria in skin compared to other tissues.The wrinkled skin showed changes similar to those seen in both intrinsic and extrinsic aging -; intrinsic aging is the natural process of aging, and extrinsic aging is the effect of external factors that influence aging, such as skin wrinkles that develop from excess sun or long-term smoking.Among the details, the skin of induced-mutation mice showed increased numbers of skin cells, abnormal thickening of the outer layer, dysfunctional hair follicles and increased inflammation that appeared to contribute to skin pathology. These are similar to extrinsic aging of the skin in humans. The mice with depleted mitochondrial DNA also showed changed expression of four aging-associated markers in cells, similar to intrinsic aging.The skin also showed disruption in the balance between matrix metalloproteinase enzymes and their tissue-specific inhibitor -; a balance of these two is necessary to maintain the collagen fibers in the skin that prevent wrinkling.The mitochondria of induced-mutation mice had reduced mitochondrial DNA content, altered mitochondrial gene expression, and instability of the large complexes in mitochondria that are involved in oxidative phosphorylation.Reversal of the mutation restored mitochondrial function, as well as the skin and hair pathology. This showed that mitochondria are reversible regulators of skin aging and loss of hair, an observation that Singh calls “surprising.””It suggests that epigenetic mechanisms underlying mitochondria-to-nucleus cross-talk must play an important role in the restoration of normal skin and hair phenotype,” Singh said, who has a secondary UAB appointment as professor of pathology. “Further experiments are required to determine whether phenotypic changes in other organs can also be reversed to wildtype level by restoration of mitrochondrial DNA.” Source:https://www.uab.edu/news/research/item/9607-scientists-reverse-aging-associated-skin-wrinkles-and-hair-loss-in-a-mouse-modellast_img read more

Seattle Childrens opens new clinic to provide convenient access to pediatric specialty

first_img Source:http://www.seattlechildrens.org/ Aug 16 2018Seattle Children’s today announced the opening of its newest regional clinic, Seattle Children’s North Clinic, which will provide convenient access to pediatric specialty care services for families in north King, Snohomish, Whatcom and Skagit counties. The 37,000-square-foot clinic is located on Providence Regional Medical Center Everett’s Colby Campus at 1815 13th St.The new clinic will provide services in more than 18 pediatric specialties, including audiology, otolaryngology, cardiology, rehabilitation and sports therapy, among others. It will also include an urgent care clinic, offering same-day appointments, including holidays, an imaging center, Child Wellness Clinic, and playroom for patients and siblings.”We’re committed to meeting the needs of families in the north by providing world-class care closer to home,” said David Stolte, director of North Sound Regional Clinics. “Families will no longer have to choose between getting pediatric-focused care and convenience. We’ll be located where patients and families need us, in their community.”Seattle Children’s North replaces both Seattle Children’s Everett and Mill Creek clinics, which closed as of Aug. 10, adding ten new pediatric services to the North Sound area. In addition to Seattle Children’s North, Seattle Children’s has specialty regional clinics in Bellevue, Federal Way, Olympia, Tri-Cities and Wenatchee.Kara Chitwood said Seattle Children’s will always hold a special place in her heart. When her son, Bretton, broke his ankle in nine places in 2016 he was rushed to Seattle Children’s Mill Creek Clinic from their home in Lynden, Washington. He needed to be closely monitored after his initial visit, and so the family found themselves traveling to the clinic nearly every week for appointments.”We’ve always had wonderful experiences at Seattle Children’s,” said Chitwood. “We wouldn’t go anywhere else.”Chitwood credits the expert care they received at the clinic for saving her son’s life. After returning to play hockey after his ankle healed, Bretton experienced lingering pain. Chitwood called their provider at the clinic who ordered imaging for the next day. Later that week, the family found out Bretton had osteosarcoma, an aggressive bone cancer.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance values”He could have had a very different outcome if we wouldn’t have caught it so early,” said Chitwood.Bretton recently graduated high school and is preparing for college in the fall.”As parents, we want to make sure our children receive the best care,” said Chitwood. “Knowing how well Seattle Children’s ranks both regionally and nationally, it’s where we’ll continue to go. I could take my children somewhere else, or I could go to Seattle Children’s North Clinic where I know we’ll get better care and faster.”Jennifer Campbell’s 6-year-old daughter, Hannah, has been a patient at Seattle Children’s since birth. Only 12 hours after being born, Hannah was transferred to Seattle Children’s with a rapid heartbeat and diagnosed with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), a rapid heartbeat that can be common in newborns, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a thickening of the heart muscle. After a couple weeks, Hannah was sent home for the first time, but her condition worsened. Her heart doubled in size and was failing. She need needed a heart transplant and quickly. Doctors weren’t sure she’d make it to transplant, but on Sept. 23, 2012, they got the call. At only 4 months old, Hannah received a new heart.”Seattle Children’s saved our daughter’s life,” said Campbell.Today, Hannah is 6 years old and thriving. Campbell said she is excited for Seattle Children’s North to open. The clinic is only a 10-minute drive from their home.Hannah needs to get her blood drawn nearly every month, and so the lab at the clinic will be much more convenient for the family, rather than having to drive to Seattle Children’s main campus.”We’re going to be at the clinic a lot,” said Campbell. “From fevers to blood draws, it will be nice to have a place we’re familiar with and trust so close to home. Seattle Children’s really is like an extension of our family.”last_img read more

Got allergies Blame parasites

first_imgWhy are millions of people allergic to peanuts or pollen, but hardly anyone seems to have a reaction to rice or raisins? Because only some of these things carry molecules similar to those found in parasites that send our immune systems into hyperdrive, according to a new study. The advance could help researchers predict what other foods might cause allergies.Allergies begin when a type of antibody known as Immunoglobulin E (IgE) recognizes a so-called allergen—a peanut protein, for example—and binds to it. In some cases, this causes the immune system to overreact, ultimately leading to symptoms ranging from a runny nose to life-threatening anaphylactic shock.Scientists have long argued that this mechanism originally evolved to defend humans and animals against parasites like certain worms. In developed countries, where people’s immune systems are hardly ever confronted by such parasites, the immune system may begin targeting other molecules by mistake, causing allergic reactions. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country To bolster this hypothesis, a group of scientists led by computational biologist Nicholas Furnham at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine looked for similarities among 2712 proteins known to cause allergies and more than 70,000 proteins from 31 species of parasites. Using computer programs that compared the protein sequences as well as their 3D structures, the researchers identified a list of 2445 parasite proteins that are very similar to allergenic proteins. For instance, they found a protein in the worm Schistosoma mansoni that closely resembles one in birch pollen that makes people sneeze.To see whether these predictions checked out in the real world, the scientists collected blood from 222 people in Uganda infected with the worm S. mansoni. They found that about one in six of them produced antibodies that recognized the pure worm protein. “We predicted that this protein in [S.] mansoni should be recognized by the immune system, because a fragment of it is similar to this birch protein which causes allergies,” Furnham says. It is “the first example of a plant pollen–like protein in a worm that is targeted by IgE,” the researchers write today in PLOS Computational Biology.“It’s a very nice paper,” says Maria Yazdanbakhsh, a parasitologist at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands. Some examples of allergens resembling worm proteins were already known, she says, but this is the first systematic look. “They present a method that allows you to identify new allergens. That’s a wonderful tool that can be applied to many things.”One future use would be to screen new foods for possible allergens, Furnham says. The results could even help researchers design better therapies for people suffering from allergies, he argues. In immunotherapy (like allergy shots), people are exposed to increasing doses of an allergen to desensitize their immune systems. Knowing what parasite protein the allergen resembles could allow doctors to give that protein to patients instead of the pollen; that would make it easier to dose the allergy shots, as well as make the immunotherapy safer, Furnham says. “But that is a long way down the line,” he cautions.A worm defense gone awry may explain some, but not all, allergies, says immunologist Ruslan Medzhitov of Yale University. He recently argued that some allergies may have an evolutionary purpose, like keeping humans away from environmental toxins. “Here the authors choose examples of allergens that support their view and ignore the ones that don’t,” he says. “This paper doesn’t change my opinion on the matter.”last_img read more

Spacecraft reveal aurora near Jupiters south pole

first_img Spacecraft reveal aurora near Jupiter’s south pole NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM By Sid PerkinsOct. 30, 2017 , 12:00 PMcenter_img Our solar system’s largest planet is big enough for massive light shows—one at each pole, new research reveals. Scientists already knew that Jupiter sported an aurora in its northern hemisphere—one that is permanent, large enough to swallow Earth, and hundreds of times brighter than the ephemeral glows our planet hosts at each pole. Now, a new analysis of data gleaned by Earth-orbiting x-ray telescopes in 2007 and 2016 reveals that the gas giant hosts a second aurora on its southern end. Earth’s magnetic field isn’t strong enough to generate an aurora at x-ray wavelengths. Unlike Earth’s auroras, Jupiter’s are not in sync, researchers report today in Nature Astronomy. Whereas the newly discovered southern hot spot (seen at infrared wavelengths by instruments on the Juno probe now orbiting Jupiter) pulses once every 9 to 11 minutes, the northern x-ray hot spot has, in the past, been observed pulsing at rates of once every 12 minutes, once every 26 minutes, and once every 40 to 45 minutes. Researchers aren’t quite sure why Jupiter’s auroras aren’t synchronized: Among some possibilities, the researchers say, the disparity could stem from the immense size or strength of the planet’s magnetic field, or may simply result from unexpected processes that help generate the auroras.last_img read more

EPA unveils new industryfriendlier science advisory boards

first_imgScott Pruitt is administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. Originally published by E&E NewsThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officially unveiled new membership rosters today for several key science advisory panels that give more weight to representatives of industry and state governments at the expense of university researchers.The rosters for the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee and the Science Advisory Board posted online this morning appear to reflect the impact of restrictions put in place this week by agency chief Scott Pruitt. The new policy bars current recipients of EPA grants from serving on any agency advisory committees and effectively ends a tradition of appointing members to two consecutive three-year terms. The newly released lineups largely dovetail with an advance copy obtained earlier this week by E&E News. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Read more… “To ensure that EPA is receiving the best independent scientific advice, I am appointing highly-qualified experts and scientists to these important committees,” Pruitt said in a press release.He had already announced the appointment of Colorado-based consultant Tony Cox to chair the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC); the lists released today show that Cox will also serve as a rank-and-file member of the Science Advisory Board (SAB).Among more than a dozen other new appointees to the SAB are Merlin Lindstrom of the Phillips 66 Research Center in Oklahoma; Larry Monroe, recently retired chief environmental officer of Atlanta-based Southern Co.; and Bob Blanz, water division chief for the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality.Similarly, Pruitt had this week named Michael Honeycutt, toxicology director at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, to head the SAB.Also new to the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee, which advises EPA during periodic reviews of the air quality standards for ozone and other major pollutants, are James Boylan, a senior air branch manager at the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, and Larry Wolk, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.The position of CASAC chair was already vacant after Ana Diez Roux, a Drexel University epidemiologist, rotated off as her second term expired at the end of September. But Pruitt removed two other members, Ron Wyzga of the Electric Power Research Institute and Donna Kenski, a data analyst at Lake Michigan Air Directors Consortium, to make way for the other two new appointees.In an interview this morning, Kenski called the process “a travesty.” She said she had noted to EPA that while the consortium receives EPA funding, it is routed through state governments, a category exempted from Pruitt’s new policy, but got no effective response.After serving a prior stint on the CASAC some years ago, Kenski had again been named to the panel last year by then-EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy over the objections of Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.). Inhofe’s former chief of staff Ryan Jackson now works for Pruitt in the same capacity.Her ouster this week from the CASAC now presents “an interesting confluence of events,” Kenski said, but she added that she’s not privy to any information beyond what she has received from EPA.EPA today also announced new members of its Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC), a panel that advises the agency on its research programs.Paul Gilman, chief sustainability officer for waste management giant Covanta, is listed as chairman of the science board. Deborah Swackhamer, the previous chairwoman, is listed as a member.Swackhamer has been critical of Pruitt and EPA under the Trump administration after the new EPA chief decided against renewing the terms of several BOSC members earlier this year. She found out she was demoted earlier this week after reading a news article on her phone in the Zagreb, Croatia, airport (Greenwire, Nov. 1).Reporter Niina Heikkinen contributed.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2017. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.netEarlier coverage:Trump’s EPA has blocked agency grantees from serving on science advisory panels. Here is what it meansProposal to ban EPA grantees from agency science advisory boards stirs controversyEPA axes 38 more science advisers, cancels panel meetingsEPA fires members of science advisory board Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0) EPA unveils new industry-friendlier science advisory boards Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Sean Reilly, E&E News, Kevin Bogardus, E&E NewsNov. 3, 2017 , 1:30 PMlast_img read more

Poop vault of human feces could preserve guts microbial biodiversity—and help treat

first_img By Tania RabesandratanaNov. 1, 2018 , 12:30 PM CHRISTOPHER CORZETT Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Genomic data on the bacteria revealed another contrast between populations. In September, at a human microbiome symposium in Heidelberg, Germany, Groussin said GMC found preliminary evidence that so-called horizontal gene transfers between the strains living within one person are frequent enough to change the gut microbiome’s function during a lifetime. These gene transfers are more frequent in industrialized populations, they found, possibly as a result of higher environmental pressures, such as antibiotic use.Developing nations that have a history of exploitation can be wary of the effort. In Rwanda, for example, MIT researchers worked with John Rusine, director of the National Reference Library’s biology lab in Kigali, to gain permission to transport stool samples to the United States. Rusine says he spent several months convincing the library’s head to allow it. “Without his signature, we couldn’t ship the samples out of the country.” Each country keeps backup samples, and GMC trained local technicians to extract DNA. “Just keeping samples has no meaning if there is no further research here,” Rusine says.One way to ensure broad buy-in is to store samples in a territory perceived as “neutral, stable, safe, where their rights will be respected,” says Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, a microbiologist at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Dominguez-Bello leads an initiative to build an international storage facility modeled after the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, an underground cold storage building on a remote Norwegian island that safeguards plant diversity for future generations. Just as in the seed vault, researchers, institutions, or governments could make deposits in the microbiota vault, retrieve samples, and grant others access to them.So far, the microbiota vault is just an idea, supported by a dozen volunteer scientists; it has no planned home yet, and Dominguez-Bello says she is seeking a few hundred million dollars to endow the project and get it started.Who owns the preserved microbiome samples—and any scientific advances made using them—remains a legal puzzle. Microorganisms do fall under the Convention on Biological Diversity, a 1992 international treaty ratified by all United Nations member states except the United States. But it’s not clear whether the convention applies to microbes that come from the human body.The treaty intends to ensure that any R&D results or benefits arising from genetic resources are shared with the government or community that provided them in the first place. GMC is trying to abide by that spirit: In each country it visits, it has drawn up agreements stipulating that the stool samples and cultured bacteria strains remain the property of individual donors, and can only be used for noncommercial purposes.But the very idea of preserving cells for future studies can be problematic, Schnorr cautions. For example, in her 2014 study of the Hadza, Schnorr used samples only in the exact way her study’s consent forms described. She is skeptical that consent can be meaningful when scientists themselves don’t know what questions they may ask in the future.Kieran O’Doherty, a social scientist at the University of Guelph in Canada who has studied the ethics of microbiome research, thinks scientists should do more than archive the diversity of the human microbiome; they should look for ways to preserve it, by helping traditional peoples retain their sovereignty and natural resources. O’Doherty compares biobanking to small-scale efforts to fight climate change. “It’s a good idea to use different light bulbs or drive a different car, but we need higher-level political action,” he says. “To many scientists that’s activism, and they’re not comfortable with that.” Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Researchers distribute plastic bowls to collect fecal samples from Hadza people near Lake Eyasi in Tanzania. ‘Poop vault’ of human feces could preserve gut’s microbial biodiversity—and help treat disease Whether in villages on the coast of Ghana or in the mountains of Rwanda, asking for people’s poop is a good icebreaker, Mathieu Groussin says. “Everybody laughs,” says Groussin, a microbiologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. “Especially when we stress that we need the whole fecal sample and show them the big bowl.”He’s asking on behalf of the Global Microbiome Conservancy (GMC), an effort to identify and preserve gut bacteria from different peoples around the world. Most microbiome research has focused on Western, urban populations, which typically eat processed foods and use antibiotics. The few studies of traditional peoples have found a far more diverse gut microbiome that appears to be linked to the absence of certain diseases.But as traditional societies change their lifestyles, that biodiversity is under threat, says Eric Alm, an MIT microbiologist who co-founded GMC in 2016 with Groussin and two other MIT postdocs. “Strains that coevolved with humans are currently disappearing,” he says. Later this month, Groussin plans to expand the growing conservatory with samples from Nigerian communities affected by oil pollution near the Niger River delta. Rescuing and preserving the microbes, Alm says, could pave the way for new treatments not just for gut ailments, but for other disorders linked to the microbiome—such as asthma, allergy, obesity, and diabetes. “I’m 100% confident that there are relevant medical applications for hundreds of strains we’ve screened and characterized,” he says.Gathering material from human subjects and importing it to the United States for posterity raises ethical and legal complications, however. And the project itself represents a pessimistic outlook, says Stephanie Schnorr, a biological anthropologist at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas who has studied the microbiome of the Hadza, a traditional people in Tanzania. “Keeping a biobank is already expecting that diversity loss is an inevitable process,” she says.GMC’s biobank now houses about 11,000 strains, from about 40 people in seven countries. Its budget will support visits until 2021 to about 34 countries in total—from the Arctic to Africa, Asia, Oceania, and South America. After that, organizers hope to find several million dollars per year to expand the research and fund local science.For now, the focus is on gathering strains. On collecting trips, Groussin retrieves the filled plastic bowls the morning after distributing them—or, in places with high fiber diets, within the hour. He then processes the samples in a makeshift lab in the back of a car. Portions of the stool are fixed and dried for DNA sequencing and lipid content measurement. The rest is divided into small tubes, preserved in glycerol, and shipped back to Cambridge in containers at −190°C. There, bacterial strains are isolated, using growth media that mimic the conditions of the gut, and preserved in perpetuity in large freezers.The team is already uncovering novel strains. The 7000 strains in GMC’s library that came from North American peoples include only five previously unknown genera. But the 4000 strains from Africa and the Arctic have already yielded 55 unknown genera. 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More American Tourists Die In The Dominican Republic

first_img 7. June 7, 2019 Susie Lauterborn and her husband, Doug Hand, took a trip to the Grand Bahia Principe in January 2018. Within a day of arriving, she said she began experiencing severe nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, body aches, fatigue, chills, and cold sweats https://t.co/CpTMsqZlZz pic.twitter.com/ZzU3jtLBBC— BuzzFeed News (@BuzzFeedNews) June 7, 2019 Three more people who stayed at the Bahia Principe hotel revealed that they too fell ill during their stay. Susie Lauterborn, 38, and her husband, Doug Hand, 40, said they quickly became ill during their stay at the hotel in January 2008 experiencing severe nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, body aches, fatigue, chills, and cold sweats. The pair claimed the food “tasted off to the point where I was like, ‘I’m not even going to drink a glass of wine because it just tastes off.’ I can’t even explain — we ate pasta one night, and it was so bad I couldn’t finish it. It tasted acidic, like battery acid.”Myroslav Sparavalo, a 58-year-old in New York that he was lucky to survive his stay at the now disgraced resort just a month ago. Sparvalo said he began to feel unwell after dinner. He told Buzzfeed that after eating he began to experience a hypertensive crisis, or a severely high increase in blood pressure, which can lead to a stroke. Surveillance video shows the moment MLB star David Ortiz was shot in the back at a Dominican Republic bar last night. Officials say he’s in stable condition after undergoing surgery DETAILS: https://t.co/qwaiwdxhTS pic.twitter.com/jH0bZ1Kg43— WSVN 7 News (@wsvn) June 10, 2019While Dominican roads are notorious for its deadly car crashes, something else has been going on there causing the demise of a number of American tourists, most of whom were Black.Aside from the Ortiz shooting, there have already been at least six deaths reported and at least one reported attempted murder of Americans visiting the Dominican Republic just six months into the year. Three of the deaths happened a resort in La Romana on the country’s southeastern coast. The other three took place in Punta Cana, a resort town located on the country’s east coast that is known for its partying scene popular with Spring Breakers.The tragic trend has reportedly prompted the FBI to investigate, according to Fox News, which reported that the federal law enforcement agency began its involvement last week.Since the first recent deaths of Americans in the Dominican Republic were reported, several tourists have come out to talk about their own horrifying experiences there, which range from becoming violently ill to being allegedly kidnapped and beaten by a hotel employee. 11. June 11, 2019 Dominican authorities asked for FBI assistance for further toxicology analysis on the recent Bahia Principe, La Romana cases. Their FBI colleagues say those results may take up to 30 days. They request patience while the investigations run their course.https://t.co/yTGoMv6Grk— Laurie Kelly (@LaurieKellyMD) June 12, 2019 The U.S. Embassy in the Dominican Republic issues a statement saying it was aware of the recent deaths and sicknesses to American citizens.“The U.S. Embassy in Santo Domingo is actively working with the Government of the Dominican Republic and the private sector at the highest levels to ensure that U.S. citizens are safe and feel safe while in the Dominican Republic,” a brief statement said in part. 3. May 25, 2019 BREAKING: The brother in law of 41 y/o Miranda Schaup-Werner says she died 5 days before Nathaniel Holmes & Cynthia Day died at the SAME Dominican Republic resort, Bahia Principe Hotel in La Romona. He claims Schaup-Werner had a drink in the room’s mini bar. #MirandaSchaupWerner— Shomari Stone (@shomaristone) June 4, 2019 Miranda Schaup-Werner checked into a Bahia Principe hotel with her husband, the same day as a Black Maryland couple. Reports said that Schaup-Werner had a drink from the mini bar and suddenly became violently ill. She then collapsed on the floor and died in her hotel room. The National Police Investigations Unit concluded she died of a heart attack. Deaths & illness:Miranda Schaupp-Werner, PA – deadEdward Holmes & Cynthia Day – deadAwilda Montes, NY – violently ill Robert Bell Wallace, CA – deadDavid Harrison, MD – deadYvette Monique Sport, PA – deadTerrence Richmond – deadKaylynn Knull, Tom Schwander CO – ill— JC Cox (@jcox713) June 9, 2019The U.S. State Department placed a travel advisory on the Dominican Republic in April because of violence. “The wide availability of weapons, the use and trade of illicit drugs, and a weak criminal justice system contribute to the high level of criminality on the broader scale,” the State Department wrote on its website.While violence in the Dominican Republic was well-documented, perhaps it was the mysterious deaths of three tourists in five days at the same Grand Bahia Principe resort in La Romana this year alone and reported sicknesses from other guests there that seemed most alarming. They all were found dead in their rooms and have been attributed to something other than natural causes.Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts consequently went on damage control and issued a brief statement denying any culpability and making reference to “false statements” associated with what it called “two unfortunate events.” The statement also threatened legal action, though it was not clear who could be targeted with a lawsuit.Scroll down to follow our complete timeline of disaster for Americans in the Dominican Republic. 13. June 17, 2019 It was really heartbreaking speaking to the family of Joseph Allen just a day after he was found dead. The 8th confirmed American tourist death in the Dominican Republic in the last year. Here’s what Joseph’s sister Jamie had to say: https://t.co/X5irvKaFzB— Steph Wash (@WashNews) June 17, 2019 It goes public that a man named Joseph Allen, 55, of New Jersey, was found dead in his hotel room at Terra Linda in Sosua in the Dominican Republic on June 13. He is the eight tourist to die in the country since last year. InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) Americas, which has three hotels in DR, CEO Elie Maalouf told FOX that there is nothing to fear in DR and everything is “well regulated and safe.” 4. May 29, 2019 Tammy Lawrence-Daley suffered a broken nose, fractured eye socket, nerve damage throughout her head and her entire mouth had to be sewn back together. https://t.co/Duo2sn6boE— News 8 – WROC-TV (@News_8) June 6, 2019 Tammy Lawrence-Daley posted a disturbing account of her assault allegedly at the hands of an employee at a Punta Cana resort in January. Lawrence-Daley claimed that as he was walking alone to get a snack in the evening, she was kidnapped and beaten for hours. She said that the assailant thought he killed her, but she managed to get away. She was taken to the hospital were she suffered severe injuries like nerve damage and a broken orbital. The Majestic Elegance Resort is now claiming there are inconsistencies in Lawrence-Daley’s story and said she demanded $2.2 million or she was going to go public with her story. 5. May 30, 2019 Edward Nathaniel Holmes, 63, and Cynthia Ann Day, 49, were found in a room at the Playa Nueva Romana in the Dominican Republic https://t.co/8X4OoLd8z6— FOX Baltimore (@FOXBaltimore) June 1, 2019 Maryland couple Cynthia Ann Day, 49, and Nathaniel Edward Holmes, 63, were found dead in their Bahia Principe hotel room the day they were scheduled to catch a flight back to the United States. Day and Holmes had been there five days before they died, and told family and friends that they were having a good time.An autopsy later revealed that the pair died from respiratory failure and pulmonary edema caused by excess fluid in their lungs. It is still a mystery as to what caused their condition. 12. June 13, 2019 Sorry ppl, but there’s a serial killer working in the #DominicanRepublic. After two recent visits there, I’m done with the DR. God help them and their #tourism business— Kevin (@DebtNationUSA) June 13, 2019 After so many sudden deaths of American tourists and the FBI joining the investigation, people on social media begin to wonder if there is serial killer in in the Dominican Republic. Many people vow to not return to the island.center_img 2. March 26, 2019 New Yorkers Portia Ravenelle and Orlando Moore went on vacation at the Grand Bahia Principe in the Dominican Republic. U.S. Customs say the couple never boarded flight back to Newark on March 26. Their rental car was never returned and their cell phones go straight to voicemail. pic.twitter.com/OULE45WBws— Paul Sacca (@Paul_Sacca) April 8, 2019 New York couple Orlando Moore, 43, and Portia Ravenelle, 51, were scheduled to catch a flight back to the United States from Sumana, but they never made it to the airport. Their bodies were identified two weeks later. It was determined that the pair died after their car plunged off a cliff as they made their way to the airport. Ravenelle was found unconscious on the side of the road and later died at a local hospital. Moore’s body was found at sea. According to the World Health Organization, the Dominican Republic ranked fifth in road deaths per capita in 2016. 8. June 7, 2019 In regards to the information that has been spread by various media outlets and social media, we would like to express: https://t.co/fT2Qj8jR7K En respuesta a las informaciones que están siendo publicadas por diversos medios de comunicación y redes sociales, manifestamos: pic.twitter.com/BjjJd9mJdd— BahiaPrincipe (@BahiaPrincipe) June 7, 2019 Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts released a statement seeming to distance itself from the deaths that have happened on its Dominican property.“As a result of the misinformation that has been published, which we wholeheartedly disagreewith, Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts has suffered great damage to its image and reputation,” the statement said in part. 6. June 5, 2019 #USA Kaylynn Knull and Tom Schwander of Colorado shared an image from their trip to the Bahia Principe Hotel in La Romana in a post on Instagram on Wednesday, imploring vacationers to be careful as they travel. pic.twitter.com/vJnY7mYHTK— CaribbeanNewsNetwork (@caribbeannewsuk) June 6, 2019 Colorado couple Kaylynn Knull and her Tom Schwander talked to the media about their trip to the Grand Bahia Principe resort last year. Knull claimed their room smelled like someone “dumped paint everywhere,” which she said lead to excessive drooling and watering of their eyes. She said after switching rooms, she became gravely ill experiencing severe cramps that felt like “a chainsaw going through my gut.” A Colorado doctor determined they had been poisoned by organophosphate, which are chemicals found in insecticide. They warned tourists not to stay in that hotel. 9. June 9, 2019 Six years ago, David Ortiz’s spirit and resolve helped us all begin to heal from the Boston Marathon bombing. Today, I want to join many others in wishing him a speedy recovery of his own. Get well soon, Papi. pic.twitter.com/9orpBgnVI5— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) June 10, 2019 Boston Red Sox star David Ortiz was shot in the back BY a motorcyclist who approached him at a club in Santo Domingo. Reports say the bullet entered his back and exited his stomach. Ortiz was in stable condition after undergoing surgery. He was transported back to Boston Monday evening to continue his recovery. 10. April 14, 2019 JUST IN: US State Dept confirms a 4th American tourist death in the Dominican Republic. He has been identified as Robert Bell Wallace, a native of the Bay Area https://t.co/b4FVoGiGoD pic.twitter.com/EDtuPxad2V— KRON4 News (@kron4news) June 10, 2019 “Robert Bell Wallace, 67, of California, became ill almost immediately after he had a scotch from the room minibar at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino resort in Punta Cana, his niece, Chloe Arnold,” Fox News reported. He died April 14, three days after he and his wife arrived at the Dominican Republic. 1. June 2018 @MaureenUmehFox5 Good Morning, I just heard your news segment on the CA man that also died in the DR. There was another under the same circumstances last June. Check out 51-year-old Yvette Monique Sport of PA, at the Bahia Principe hotel in Punta Cana, DR. — Lisette Brooks (@MissL_Thang) June 10, 2019 One year ago this month, a Black woman died in Punta Cana at a Baha Principe resort hotel. Reports say that Yvette Monique Sport, 51, took a drink from a mini bar in the hotel and went to sleep but never woke up. Sport’s family said it has been waiting a year for toxicology reports. The hotel that Sport died in is owned by the same company the owns the hotel where at least three other people would die almost one year later. Adults enjoying pool party at hotel resort in Dominican RepublicSource: Heather Paul / GettyUPDATED: 8:30 a.m. EDT, June 18 —More American tourists are dying in the Dominican Republic. A man named Joseph Allen, 55, of Avenel, New Jersey, was found dead in his hotel room at Terra Linda in Sosua in the Dominican Republic on June 13. He is the eight tourist to die in the country since last year but hotels insist there is nothing to fear.InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) Americas CEO Elie Maalouf told FOX that there is nothing to fear, “We have three hotels in the Dominican Republic. They are operating safely, have had no incidents… While this is an unfortunate set of incidents, travelers can be assured that the hotel industry, travel industry is well regulated [and] safe.”UPDATED: 3:10 p.m. EDT, June 14 —At least eight American tourists have died in the Dominican Republic after the death of a woman this week, according to new reports. Leyla Cox was found dead in her resort in Punta Cana on the island nation’s east coast. The 53-year-old New Yorker was among the new names of people who have either died or become violently ill in the popular vacation destination this year, NBC News reported.Cox’s death came shortly before it was reported that an Ohio man died in a separate Punt Cana resort in January. While it wasn’t immediately clear how Cox died, Jerry Curran’s death was attributed to pulmonary edema, which was the diagnosis of multiple other people who have recently been found dead at their Dominican resorts.In what appeared to be an unrelated incident, “on Tuesday 40-year-old Surely Miller vanished from a beach in the coastal town of Cabarete in Puerto Plata province,” the New York Daily News reported on Friday. “She was apparently dragged out to sea in a rip tide.”Prior to the most recent death disclosures, the attention surrounding recent multiple deaths of American tourists in the Dominican Republic was at a fever pitch as survivors of the dead were waiting for toxicology reports to determine how exactly they died. The results could take up to 30 days, according to ABC News.The developments finally prompted the U.S. ambassador on the island nation to acknowledge what has been happening.“The safety of U.S. citizens that live in, work in, and visit the Dominican Republic remains our highest priority,” Robin Bernstein, the U.S. Ambassador to the Dominican Republic, said in a statement. “These incidents are tragic and we offer our deepest condolences to those personally impacted.”While the embassy asked “everyone to be patient while these investigations run their course,” the families of Edward Nathaniel Holmes and Cynthia Ann Day, a Black couple engaged to be married who were found dead in their hotel room late last month, plan to have their own toxicology tests and autopsies conducted independently of Dominican authorities.The deadly Dominican episodes coupled with illnesses and other random violence could have some people rethinking their plans to travel to the popular vacation destination. The New York Post reported that nearly 70 tourists in the Dominican Republic said they got violently sick on their trips since March. There were only 10 for all of 2018.While suspicious deaths are nothing new around the world, it was nearly impossible to ignore the seemingly nonstop news pouring out of the Dominican Republic, and most, if not all of it, has been bad, to put it mildly.SEE ALSO: What The Hell Is Happening In The Dominican Republic?That included the public ambush shooting of Major League Baseball legend David Ortiz, who survived multiple gunshot wounds in the Caribbean country’s capital of Santo Domingo on Sunday. With the shooting, the Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer more popularly known as Big Papi became the latest victim of the island nation’s recent spate of bad news that has disproportionately affected Americans. Ortiz, a Dominican native, became an American citizen in 2008.last_img read more