Budget Cuts Could Cripple Vermont Life

first_img“We have made great progress financially in the last couple of years and in other areas, too,” Kelly told FOLIO:. “Our dedicated staff has made possible a major turnaround from a significant deficit to a current year break-even budget.“Vermont Life is charged, by statute, with financial self-sufficiency,” Kelly continued. “In essence, we must make our way in the world as a business while pursuing our mission on behalf of the people of Vermont.”Although he declined to offer specific figures, Kelly said the magazine’s annual budget is about $2 million. Its revenue mix is made up of 40 percent circulation, 40 percent sales of goods (including calendars and books) and 20 percent from advertising. Financial results through the first six months this year are “ahead of budget,” he said.Launched in 1946, Vermont Life carries a total circulation of 75,000, including 50,000 subscribers. Vermont governor James Douglas has proposed state-wide budget cuts that, if passed, could result in the termination of at least two staffers at Vermont Life, that state’s official magazine. The affected positions include publisher Tom Kelly and the magazine’s marketing and advertising traffic manager.Tom Slayton, the quarterly magazine’s former editor, told the Times Argus newspaper that, if passed, the cuts would “cripple the magazine.” While the legislature considers the proposal, state representatives have also spoken out against the cuts. “This magazine is to me one of the biggest drivers of the [state] brand and now we are taking a gamble,” Rep. Ken Atkins (D-Winooski) said in the report.Vermont’s Agency of Commerce and Community Development, which includes Vermont Life, has eliminated 16 positions in the last two years—or an overall reduction of roughly 15 percent, the report said. If the cuts are passed, a deputy commissioner of the state’s Department of Tourism and Marketing would take over the publisher’s responsibilities.last_img read more

NEW STEW Meet Author Marcia Butler On Mays Book Stew

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — In the May episode of Book Stew, host Eileen MacDougall interviews author Marcia Butler.From the host: “The May Book Stew episode features another returning author. Marcia Butler first appeared on the show via Skype in December 2017, with her memoir about her life in music performance, The Skin Above My Knee (please read it if you haven’t). Having motored through a career as an oboist, as well as her second act as an interior designer, and now as a documentary filmmaker, the ever-striving Marcia has written her first novel, Pickle’s Progress.” Watch the episode, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:—Video Playerhttps://s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/wilmington.castus-vod/vod/video/3287a640-5aa2-4abd-b912-7fe46eee8d27/video.original.mp400:0000:0030:38Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNEW STEW: Meet Children’s Author Ioana Hobai On August’s Book StewIn “Videos”NEW STEW: Meet Author Ben Berkley On September’s Book StewIn “Videos”NEW STEW: Meet Author Renee Simms On June’s Book StewIn “Community”last_img read more

South Carolina Rep Jim Clyburn Says that Democrats that Want to Win

first_imgBy Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire ContributorWhile there’s at least a perceived growing number of Democrats who say they want to replace California Rep. Nancy Pelosi as the Democratic leader in the House of Representatives, South Carolina Rep. Jim Clyburn has emerged as a favorite among his peers to become the first African American to hold that position.In an exclusive interview with the NNPA Newswire, the 25-year congressman said that, while he’s ready for the challenge, Democrats currently have much bigger fish to fry.Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) says that President Trump has a deep-seated hatred for people of color that manifests itself every day. (Wikimedia Commons)“The first order of business is to win the [midterm] elections on November 6,” Clyburn said. “That’s what I’ve been concentrating on.”Clyburn and Congressional Black Caucus Chair Cedric Richmond each told the NNPA Newswire that they’ve identified 37 districts across the country they believe can be won by Democrats this year, which would wrest control of the House from Republicans.“We feel, with the right kind of effort, we can win,” Clyburn said.Clyburn listed three keys to success this November.The first key, Clyburn said, is to prioritize the Black vote; Democrats can’t afford to take the African American vote for granted.Secondly, the Democrats shouldn’t rely on an anti-President Donald Trump wave to get out the vote. Finally, Clyburn said that candidates must advertise in the Black Press, if they want to win in November.“We are also talking about districts where Barack Obama won twice and where Hillary Clinton also won, but these voters don’t turn out for the so-called ‘off-year elections,’” Clyburn said. “We can’t let these voters feel like we’re taking them for granted.”Clyburn, 78, said he was recently taken aback by one candidate, who said that he could win the Black vote by running on an anti-Trump platform.“Wait one second,” Clyburn said that he told the individual. “We can’t just go around being ‘Republican-light.’ We have to be out there putting forth an alternative message, for our base, and we have to reach out to Black voters and let them know we’re not taking them or any of our base for granted.”To that end, Clyburn said advertising campaigns must largely include the Black Press.“It’s very, very important…Chairman Richmond and I have had candidates in and we’ve been telling them that one of the best ways to demonstrate that you’re not taking the Black vote for granted is to advertise in the Black Press,” Clyburn said.The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) is the oldest and largest trade group representing the Black Press, comprised of more than 200 Black-owned newspapers operating in the United States.“I’ve been in [the Black Press]. My daughter and I ran a newspaper down South, so I know that candidates tend to take Black media for granted,” Clyburn said. “They tend to judge Black media the same way they do other media and you just can’t do that, because the business model is totally different.”Each Sunday after attending Morris Brown A.M.E. Church in Charleston, S.C., Clyburn said he and other churchgoers habitually pick up the local Black-owned newspaper.“People tend to pay attention to the headlines, the stories and the ads in the Black Press so it’s vitally important that candidates know this,” Clyburn said.A former history teacher, Clyburn said Trump’s obsession with dismantling Obama’s legacy is reminiscent of tactics employed by Andrew Johnson to demean his predecessor, Abraham Lincoln.Johnson, who was impeached by the House, had a vision of America as a White man’s government, according to historians.“If you remember, it’s the same kind of reaction Johnson had to Lincoln and I remember sitting alone once in the Oval Office with Obama and I told him that this would be the kind of reaction he could expect,” Clyburn said.“[Obama] was never going to get the kind of respect for his presidency that was shown to presidents before him,” Clyburn said. “The narrative that exists in this country is that there are certain things that Black folks are not supposed to do and one of those things is becoming the president of the United States and [President Trump] and his administration, feel they have to do whatever they can to wipe out any semblance that Barack Obama was ever president of the United States.”Clyburn continued: “[Trump] has a deep-seated hatred for people of color and it manifests itself every day.”Though he doesn’t support or agree politically with former Trump aide Omarosa Manigault Newman, Clyburn said he was deeply troubled when Trump referred to her as a “low life” and a “dog.”“I’m the father of three daughters and I’m deeply insulted by the president of the United States referring to an African American women the way he referred to her,” he said. “Politics aside, I’m insulted that the president of the United States would denigrate the office in this way.”Clyburn continued: “The president asked an important question when he was running, ‘What do we have to lose?’ Well, we have lost dignity and the respect of the presidency, because of his coarseness in the office. When you lose respect, you’ve lost about everything there is to lose.”While he still supports Pelosi, Clyburn said that if the Democrats take back the House, he’s up for the job as speaker.“I have always supported her, but I have always remembered a sermon I heard my father give a number of times,” Clyburn said. “That sermon stayed with me and he said, ‘keep your lamps trimmed and burning to be ready when the bridegroom comes.’ My point is, I’ve never forgotten that sermon so I keep my lamp burning so I’m ready.”Stacy Brown is an NNPA Newswire Contributor and co-author of “Michael Jackson: The Man Behind the Mask: An Insider’s Story of the King of Pop.” This article was originally published on BlackPressUSA.com.last_img read more