Treasured designer home set to go under the hammer this weekend

first_imgSylvia Beem is sad to be leaving her home of the past 26 years, but it’s time to downsize. Photo: Tim MarsdenThe decision to sell her Yeronga home of the last quarter century has been a tough one for Sylvia Beem – but it’s time to downsize.“It’s a big heart wrench to be honest,” she said. And it’s easy to see why she’s loved raising her family in the Hamptons style five-bedroom, three-bathroom home, because it’s a stunner.Whether children are little or big, there are plenty of usable spaces in the home. For example, Beem said the kitchen looked through concertina doors to the yard.“If you’ve got young children you can watch them playing in the garden while you’re cooking dinner,” she said.When treehouses adult, this dream home is what’s possibleWhy it pays to style a propertyGet the best Real Estate and Property News in your inbox freeMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home5 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor5 hours ago140 Kadumba St, YerongaThere’s also a library and separate office on the upper level, so older kids and parents can get away from the family buzz if needed.Beem said she used part of the four-car garage as an art studio, and its loft was self-contained with a bathroom and kitchenette. “It’s a guest quarters or for teenagers who want that little bit of independence,” she said.Beem also said the pool pavilion was perfect for outdoor entertaining.“You can have parties by the pool. You can barbecue out there and look back at the house. It’s really lovely – it’s almost like a resort,” she said.140 Kadumba St, YerongaThere’s even a secret ‘kid’s space’ to discover. “Under the stairwell my kids had their cubby house, and there are still a couple of pictures taped up under there,” she said.Beem said she would miss Yeronga and its inspirational landscape.“There’s an area where you walk along the river and you honestly could be in the countryside somewhere. Being a painter I keep wanting to paint that scene,” she said. “Yeronga has a very village-like atmosphere. It’s almost like you’re not in a major city.”140 Kadumba St, Yeronga, marketed by Judy Goodger, of Place New Farm, will be auctioned on-site Saturday May 6 at 11am.last_img read more

Rabbatts makes commission plea

first_imgFootball Association board member Heather Rabbatts has launched a fierce attack on chairman Greg Dyke’s decision to name an all-white, all-male commission to improve the England team. Press Association Rabbatts, who was born in Jamaica and is of mixed race, has written to all fellow board members criticising the lack of diversity on the commission and saying the FA is letting down black players. In her letter, she says she has tried to raise the issue privately but there has been a “refusal to understand” her position. Her decision to go public leaves Dyke and the FA facing a crisis over the commission. center_img The letter, a copy of which has been seen by Press Association Sport, stated: “I believe that the lack of proper consultation on the make up of the commission, the fact that no approval was sought from the board, releasing the names of the ‘chosen’ individuals at Leaders in Football, the composition of the commission itself and the lack of diversity, have all meant that the opportunity to lead an informed debate on the future of English players has been singularly damaged. “I make the comments about diversity not because they are additional to this matter but because they lie at its heart.” Rabbatts’ letter goes on to say it is “ironic” there is no representative from ethnic minority communities given that Andros Townsend, the Tottenham winger who played a key role in England’s victories on Friday and Tuesday and then found himself at the centre of a race row this week through no fault of his own, is himself black. Rabbatts backs the FA’s support for England boss Roy Hodgson after his dressing room joke about a monkey in space but added: “As the commission looks to address all of the complexities of its brief, it will crucially have to come to a view on nationality, race and identity. “To have announced a list without anyone who can speak from experience and in an informed manner on those three areas has exposed the FA at a vital moment. “What is required is not tokenism but the involvement of individuals who have direct and relevant experience of what it means to represent their country while coming from diverse cultural backgrounds. “By proceeding along this current path we are not only failing to reflect our national game but we are also letting down so many black and ethnic minority people – players, ex-players, coaches and volunteers, who have so much to offer and are so often discouraged and disheartened by the attitudes they encounter. The FA should be leading by example not reinforcing entrenched attitudes.” As well as Dyke, the commission will include former England manager Glenn Hoddle, Football League chairman Greg Clarke and FA vice-chairman Roger Burden, League Managers’ Association chairman Howard Wilkinson, Professional Footballers’ Association chairman Ritchie Humphreys, Crewe director of football Dario Gradi and former England defender Danny Mills. The FA has stressed the line-up of commission members is not necessarily complete, and that many other people will also be consulted. However Dyke has said it will consist of no more than 10 members. last_img read more